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2113: Stories Inspired By the Music of Rush by Kevin J. Anderson and Josh McFetridge, eds.

2113: Stories Inspired By the Music of Rush by Kevin J. Anderson and Josh McFetridge, eds.

Buy 2113 on Amazon.

Andy Rooney said, “Writers never retire.” Drummers…well, it happens and it’s not always voluntary. We know Neil Peart can’t rock the solos forever, short of having bionic arms installed (don’t think somebody hasn’t suggested it), and if you’ve read recent interviews you know what’s on his mind. Family. Writing. Somewhere he’s said he hoped to adapt Clockwork Angels the novel to film. So yeah, he’s not going anywhere in a sense.

While I didn’t love the Clockwork Angels novel, I think there’s strong potential in a film. Tighten the story and give it to right director, and I’ll go see it. I haven’t yet read the followup, because to be honest 2113 intrigued me more. Multi-author anthologies, for me, are a mixed bag in terms of quality, but this being a collection of stories – 16 of which are inspired by Rush songs – proved too tempting to resist.

Of the 18 authors included in the book, I’ve read three prior, including Kevin J. Anderson and Mercedes Lackey (I’d read somewhere she based the character Dirk from the Valdemar novels on Geddy Lee). Most die-hard fans have searched the Internet to read “A Nice Morning Drive” by Richard S. Foster, which inspired Neil to write “Dead Barchetta.” It is part of this collection, and Fritz Leiber’s “Gonna Roll the Bones” is the other reprint.

So we have 18 stories, each connected to a specific Rush song. The cover and roster suggest all science fiction, and you’ll find everything from hard SF to futuristic drama here, but 2113 also showcases some paranormal mystery and noir. For the most part, Easter eggs of Rush lyrics are scarce – which suits me fine. The stories flow nicely, much like in Rush albums where the individual songs connect to form an all-encompassing concept.

Highlights for me in 2113 include:

“On the Fringes of the Fractal” by Greg Van Eekhout – Futuristic YA about loyalty and friendship, a willingness to sacrifice social standing for a friend.

“A Patch of Blue” by Ron Collins – Another theme of “deviating from the norm,” as one Rush song goes, where creators in two different realms take similar paths for what they believe is right.

“The Burning Times, V2.0” by Brian Hodge – Like Fahrenheit 451 crossed with Harry Potter; a young person fights censorship and as a result has to save himself.

“The Digital Kid” by Michael Z. Williamson – A dreamer’s journey to overcome disability.

“Some Are Born to Save the World” by Mark Leslie – The story of a superhero’s mortality.

I won’t reveal which songs inspired which stories. As noted in the book’s introduction, one doesn’t need to be familiar with Rush’s music to enjoy the book. That the majority of the contributing authors have backgrounds in SFF keep the stories cohesive. A fair number of Rush fans I know enjoyed Clockwork Angels, but I think they will appreciate this book as much, if not more.

My only nitpick with this collection: only one female author in the bunch. If the boys sanction this as a franchise, perhaps 2114 could feature a few more women writers. Lady Rush fans do exist.

Rating: A-

Kathryn Lively is a lady Rush fan.

Beatlebone by Kevin Barry

Beatlebone by Kevin Barry

Somewhere in the middle of Beatlebone (AMZ) the author squeezes in an interlude which explains the research that went into authenticating John Lennon’s voice for this story, and the history behind Dorinish Island as once owned by the singer. Once you get to this part of the book you may think one of two things: 1) Uh, shouldn’t something like this appear at the tail end of the story, like an Afterword?, or 2) Oh, thank God.

This is not to say the prose of Beatlebone will leave your eyes crossed. It’s a uniquely told, stream of conscious narrative married with rapid exchanges of dialogue, and given the focus of the book it’s an appropriate presentation. I think that Barry’s interlude in the middle works because it’s unexpected, much like the things John experiences in this story, and perhaps unconsciously Barry tipped toward a similar “intermission” gag in the movie Help!

So it’s 1978. Lennon hasn’t cut a record of original material in about four years. He has a toddler at home and an island on the Western coast of Ireland, bought in the late 60s. He gets the idea if he spends a few days on this deserted floating rock and employs some Primal Scream therapy and chain smoking he’ll rejuvenate his creativity. Getting there, though, is half the battle, most of the headache, and all over a trip more surreal than the back-masking on “Strawberry Fields Forever.” Seems some of the locals are in no hurry to help John get to where he wants to go. In his de facto guide Cornelius, John find camaraderie and irritation in the same package. Cornelius wants to feed John blood pudding (not on a macrobiotic’s menu) and drag him to a pub and help him dodge the press with a quick hideout in a hotel full of “ranters.”

John just wants to get to the “fucken” island. What happens from there, a lost “album” spilling from John’s mind like coming down from a magnificent high, is at once lyrical and bizarre. Makes you want to go back and find In His Own Write and Spaniard in the Works to see how they compare.

Barry writes in his interlude how he sees most Lennon-centric fiction as “character assassinations.” It’s easier to do when your subject can’t speak up, but Beatlebone aims for an introspective John who doesn’t treat everybody like crap. If you’re looking for a more traditional narrative this book might drive you nuts, but it’s worth the read if you can hold on.

Rating: B

Kathryn Lively did get to cross Abbey Road, but doesn’t Scream.

Snodgrass and Other Illusions by Ian R. MacLeod

Snodgrass and Other Illusions by Ian R. MacLeod

I found Snodgrass and Other Illusions (AMZ / BN / KOBO / ITUNES) by accident. I had a credit to redeem for a free book on [defunct ebook site], and Open Road Media is one of the major publishers that accepts it. I’ve purchased a number of reprints from the house, and when this purple floating mirage of cartoon Lennon appeared on my screen I bit. This is a collection of stories from acclaimed author MacLeod, speculative and science fiction, yet Snodgrass is presented at the forefront not necessarily because of the Beatles link, but due to a recent UK television adaptation. For this review, as we’re a rock and roll book blog, I’m only reviewing this story.

Despite my trigger Buy Now finger, I remain wary of Beatles fiction. I’ve read some interesting takes and I’ve seen some shit. With the exception of John Lennon and the Mercy Street Cafe, everything I’ve read stays within the boundaries of band history. Some have classified Snodgrass as science fiction, but it’s more alternative history. It’s a What If that has a middle-aged Lennon – having missed the acorn planting, war is over if you want it phase – living hand to mouth in Birmingham. Cynthia and Julian exist, but you only hear of them in passing as John left them long ago. Them and the band. In this timeline, creative differences prompt John to quit The Beatles on the cusp of their international breakthrough. In 1990, Lennon can barely buy smokes and The Fabs have plugged along for decades, presumably with no Lennon versus McCartney tension to inspire a break-up.

It’s a bleak story, and after reading I still can’t decide who is worse off in this speculation: John for having left the band in 1962, or The Beatles for maintaining commercial popularity yet not achieving that level of influence that other bands can’t touch. Lennon comes off as grouchy and sardonic, a shell of the younger man whose dark sense of humor is legend.

I liked the story – it’s definitely one of the better Beatles fictions I’ve read. I’m slowly working through the rest of the book to see how other stories compare.

Rating: B