Summer Reading in Rock

Summer Reading in Rock

Every summer I say I will read more, and every summer I flop on the couch and pray for winter to hurry up. If it’s possible to feel too hot to read, I’ve achieved it. I fear I’ve reached a point in my life where I have to psych myself not only to read a book, but discuss it. Typically I pledge to read 150 books a year on my Goodreads account. This year I shot low – 50 – but I’ll surpass that number. By how much, I can’t say.

I’ve bought rock books, reserved them at the library, and put them away. I apologize for hitting the low curve of the cycle once again, but I have finished a few titles and have thoughts. I look forward to the later half of this year when biographies of Stevie Nicks and Artimus Pyle are released. In the meantime…

The Beatles Play Shea by James Woodall
a Kindle single – buy at Amazon


This title is short. I picked it up during a Kindle Unlimited trial that included The Handmaid’s Tale and a Fred Stoller memoir. The sub-title on the cover misled me at bit. I had expected to read an actual history of the landmark concert at Shea Stadium and instead came away learning very little. There’s buildup to the event but little substance, and at times the narrative strayed to other topics distantly relevant to the event.

Most Kindle singles tend to be essays that may appear in parts in magazines, or long chapters of current or future works. I get the impression it’s the case here. Had I purchased this title instead of taken advantage of it during the KU trial, I would have been more disappointed.

Rating: C-

Altamont: The Rolling Stones, The Hells Angels, and the Inside Story of Rock’s Darkest Day by Joel Selvin
Buy at Amazon


I can’t explain what it is about the Altamont concert that attracts me. I’ve seen Gimme Shelter and read other accounts of the day (there’s a Kindle single about this, too, reviewed here). Somebody even made a short documentary about Meredith Hunter, the man stabbed by a Hell’s Angel security guard. It’s all history seems to tell about the day, but if the topic is new to you this book covers everything from the initial plans for the concert to its multiple tragic aftermaths.

I hadn’t realized Hunter wasn’t the sole casualty at Altamont, and I won’t spoil the book’s contents. It’s an engaging tangle of ambition and opportunity in a time when the Stones struggled to compete for face time – with the Beatles fading from the picture, now they had to deal with the California sound and recent Woodstock alumni. Altamont was to have been the West Coast answer to the festival, and this book offers up a nice guide on how not to plan a free concert. It’s a story that may make you angry as well, particularly when you read of Hunter’s story and that of friends and family after the show.

Rating: B

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *